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The Partnership for Male Youth

1010 Massachusetts Ave, NW Suite 511

Washington, DC 20001

Dennis Barbour, JD | President and CEO

202-841-7475

dbarbour@partnershipformaleyouth.org

Our Mission

The Partnership’s mission is to work with and on behalf of adolescent and young adult males to optimize their health and ensure that they thrive.

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policy

Abstinence-Only Education Budget

What Trump's Abstinence-Only Education Budget Means for Young People

Teen Vogue: February 20, 2018

Conversation Therapy

Statement from the Human Rights Campaign

February 15, 2018

 

Earlier this month, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) approved a policy statement stating that "'conversion therapies' should not be part of any behavioral health treatment of children and adolescents.” Previously, practice parameters on “Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Youth” had been published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, stating, "clinicians should be aware that there is no evidence that sexual orientation can be altered through therapy, and that attempts to do so may be harmful… Given that there is no evidence that efforts to alter sexual orientation are effective, beneficial or necessary, and the possibility that they carry the risk of significant harm, such interventions are contraindicated."

The new AACAP policy expands on this: “The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry finds no evidence to support the application of any ‘therapeutic intervention’ operating under the premise that a specific sexual orientation, gender identity and/or gender expression is pathological. Furthermore, based on the scientific evidence, the AACAP asserts that such ‘conversion therapies’ (or other interventions imposed with the intent of promoting a particular sexual orientation and/or gender as a preferred outcome) lack scientific credibility and clinical utility. Additionally, there is evidence that such interventions are harmful.”

Conversion therapy has been universally criticized by the American Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, American Medical Association and every other mainstream medical and mental health organization. Increasingly, more states are taking action to protect LGBTQ youth from the harmful practice. California, Connecticut, Illinois, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and the District of Columbia have enacted laws or regulations to protect minors from being subjected to so-called “conversion therapy” by state-licensed mental health providers. In several states, these bills were signed into law by Republican governors, illustrating the bipartisan support for curbing the harmful practice.

And these bipartisan efforts are making a difference. A Williams Institute study found that 6,000 LGBTQ youth who live in states that protect against the practice would have been subjected to conversion therapy by a licensed healthcare professional if these protections had not been put in place. However, more work needs to be done. The same Williams Institute report found that approximately 20,000 LGBTQ minors will be subjected to conversion therapy by a licensed healthcare professional in states without laws protecting them from the practice.

That is why HRC is working with organizations such as the National Center for Lesbian Rights to expand the number of states that protect minors from conversion therapy, and with municipalities around the country to pass local legislation when states are slow to act. In the past month, the Washington State Senate and New Hampshire House of Representatives voted to advance legislation that would protect LGBTQ youth from conversion therapy. In addition, last week, Maryland lawmakers introduced bills in both state legislative chambers to safeguard LGBTQ minors from this dangerous and discredited practice.

 

At the federal level, HRC is working to pass the Therapeutic Fraud Prevention Act, which would expressly classify the selling and advertising of so-called “conversion therapy” as prohibited consumer fraud. Last year, dozens of AACAP members joined HRC for a Children’s Mental Health Providers LGBTQ Youth Policy Lobby Day, where attendees lobbied on the Therapeutic Fraud Prevention Act and other legislation that would impact LGBTQ youth.

HRC commends AACAP for this new policy statement and is committed to ensuring that in every state, LGBTQ youth are protected from this destructive and detrimental practice.

Title X Family Planning Program and Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

 

Educating Members of Congress about the Trump Proposed Elimination of the Title X Family Planning Program and the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: July 27, 2017

 

GUIDANCE: Advocacy vs. Educating Policymakers – limitations for some organizations

 

Generally, federal grantees can advocate for federal funding (activities such as asking members to take action on legislation, support a particular program funding level, or vote in a specific way). However, they just cannot use their federal funds to do so. But, be sure you’re familiar with the rules of your organization; some prohibit advocacy.

 

If you aren’t able to advocate, that doesn’t mean there is nothing for you to do. You can still do your part to protect the federal programs that are making a difference in your community, by educating members of Congress about the work these programs are doing. Simply sharing information about the great work that the Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program or the Title X Family Planning Program is supporting in your community is education, not advocacy. For examples of the difference between advocating and educating, see the attached sample advocacy letter and sample education letter.

 

If you are advocating, you should have a policy-related “ask,” such as “please maintain funding for the evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program and the Title X Family Planning Program for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 and beyond.”

 

To look up your Representative, click here and enter your zip code in the box on the top right. To find your Senators, click here.

 

Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Education

 

The Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program is a high-quality example of tiered, evidence-based grantmaking that use evidence to inform awards as well as continuous improvement.

 

Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program

Current Status for FY 2017: At the beginning of May, the President signed an omnibus appropriations bill to fund the government through the end of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, which ends September 30, 2017. It maintains level funding of $101 million for the TPP Program. Please see The National Campaign’s statement and page 987 of the bill for more information.

 

What’s Happened So Far for FY 2018 Appropriations:

  • The TPP Program needs to be funded annually

  • On May 23rd, the President released his FY 2018 budget, which proposes to eliminate the TPP Program (see page 91). While the President’s budget is a proposal and does not become law, it does signal to Congress the President’s priorities and what he is willing to eliminate. Please see The National Campaign’s statement on the President’s budget proposal

  • Congress ultimately controls the purse strings, and the appropriations process for FY 2018 (October 1, 2017 – September 30, 2018) just began in July

  • On July 20th the House Appropriations Committee voted to pass the LHHS bill out of committee, along party lines. The bill eliminates funding for the TPP Program. Representative Lee proposed an amendment to restore the TPP Program, but it failed. See the National Campaign’s statement on the bill

 

What Happens Next:

  • The Senate will take up their version of the bill, but they are not expected to do so before the August recess. In the meantime, we need your help to protect this funding. August recess is a great opportunity to meet with your Senators when they will be home in the district. Now is the time to start trying to schedule those meetings

  • If you can advocate, ask your Senators: “Please protect the current funding level and structure of the evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program administered by the HHS Office of Adolescent Health”

  • For more ways to take action, even if you can only educate, click here

 

Another Threat to the TPP Program

Separate from the appropriations process, the TPP Program faces another challenge. In early July, TPP Program grantees were notified by OAH that their five-year projects will end after year three (July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018). Year three funding comes from FY 2017 funding, which has already been appropriated. These notices of shortened project periods are highly unusual. If your organization received such a notice, you may want to inform your members of Congress, especially those who you have previously shared information with about the important work you are doing through your grant. Our understanding is that some other HHS grants have also been shortened.

 

What Can You Do to Protect the TPP Program (Hint: Everyone Can Do Something) Whether you can advocate or only educate, it is critical that you reach out to your members of Congress, especially if there is a current TPP Program benefitting your community. If you’re not sure of the difference, please see Advocacy vs. Educating Policymakers.

If you have two minutes and can advocate: Please consider having your organization sign on to this letter from more than 200 national, state, and local groups asking Congressional Leadership to support maintaining investments in the TPP Program.

If you have two minutes and can educate: Spread the word to other organizations about the sign- on letter using the following copy: “I’m sharing a sign-on letter coordinated by The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy asking Congress to maintain investments in the evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program. These programs are serving youth and communities with the greatest need. The National Campaign will continue adding organizations to strengthen the chorus of voices. We hope you will consider adding your organization. To add your organization’s name to the letter click here.

If you have more time, there are a number of ideas below that you can use whether advocating for these programs or educating policymakers.

If You Have 20 Minutes or More

  • If you have board members or other friends who have good relationships with your Congressional delegation, encourage them to weigh in - a quick phone call or email from someone who is well connected goes a long way

  • Ask the young people you work with to lend their voice - Consider working with your young people to draft letters to the editor, send emails to elected officials, and/or use social media to encourage their friends to contact their elected officials. If you’re not already, please like follow The National Campaign on Facebook and follow @TheNC on Twitter - we post a lot of helpful info about these programs that you can retweet or use to draft your own content

  • Collect short stories or quotes from the youth you serve, and parents/guardians when possible, to showcase the impact of your work in the community and to put a personal face on the work you do. Use these narratives to enhance communications about the importance of your work and continued funding. Consider including these quotes in a newsletter, and then forward them to members of Congress to educate them on the great work happening in their state/district

  • Send an alert to others in your network asking them to contact elected officials to let them know about the value of your program

 

If You Have an Hour or More

  • Develop a statement or news release to make sure local press know about the grants serving your area, and how they benefit your community

  • Create documents to use in your outreach efforts that demonstrate the scope of your project, how much funding is going into the state or district, and how many people are being served with the funds. See grantee Success Stories created by the Office of Adolescent Health for examples, and a great one-pager from TPP Program grantee, Mission West Virginia

  • Take advantage of recess in the House and Senate when members of Congress will be in their home districts and try to set up meetings and site visits with them

 

Key Messages to Use in Your Outreach

  • Since the TPP Program began in 2010, the teen birth rate has declined by 41%, more than double the decline in any preceding six-year period

  • Investing in evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs saves taxpayer dollars. Teen pregnancy costs taxpayers at least $9.4 billion annually, and the estimated savings in 2010 alone due to the 61% decline in the teen birth rate between 1991 and 2010 was $12 billion

  • 85% of adults (including 75% of Republicans and 89% of Democrats) favor maintaining federal funding for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program and the Personal Responsibility Education Program

  • If you can advocate on TPP Program, the key message is: Please protect the current funding level and structure of the evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program administered by the HHS Office of Adolescent Health

 

Additional Resources

 

Contraception

 

Birth control is directly linked to a wide array of benefits to women, men, children, and society, including fewer unplanned pregnancies. It is also the case that nearly half (45%) of all pregnancies in the US are reported by women themselves as unplanned. The good news is unplanned pregnancy is declining for the first time in decades, however great disparities remain - women of color, low-income women, and women with less education all have higher rates of an unplanned pregnancy.

 

The Title X Family Planning Program (Title X) and Medicaid are important programs that support low- income women’s access to birth control. In addition, the Affordable Care Act strengthened affordable access to contraception by expanding the number of Americans with public or private health insurance and eliminating cost-sharing for contraception.

 

The key messages and resources directly below apply to Title X, Medicaid, and no co-pay birth control. Jump to Title X, Medicaid, and no co-pay birth control for the current status, and what you can do to protect each one.

 

Key Messages on Birth Control

  • 81% of adults (including 70% of Republicans and 90% of Democrats) agree that birth control is a basic part of women’s health care (The National Campaign, 2016)

  • 91% of Americans find birth control morally acceptable (Gallup, 2017). In fact, more than 90% of all Americans (across political parties, race, and ethnicity) agree that for those trying not to get pregnant, using birth control is taking personal responsibility (The National Campaign, 2016)

  • Ensuring women have the power to decide if, when, and under what circumstances to become pregnant improves educational attainment and family wellbeing, saves taxpayer dollars, and reduces abortion

 

Birth Control Resources

 

Title X Family Planning Program

 

Current Status (FY 2017): At the beginning of May, the President signed an omnibus appropriations bill to fund the government through the end of the FY 2017, which ends September 30, 2017. It maintains level funding of $286.5 million for the Title X program. Please see The National Campaign’s statement and page 952 of the bill for more information.

What Happened So Far for FY 2018 Appropriations:

  • Title X needs to be funded annually

  • On May 23, President Trump released his FY 2018 budget request, which includes level funding at $286.5 million for the Title X program (see PDF page 289). However, it also proposes to prohibit any funding in the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies (LHHS) appropriations bill (which funds Title X), “for certain entities that provide abortion, including Planned Parenthood.” Please see The National Campaign’s statement on the President’s budget proposal

  • As a reminder, the President’s budget does not become law. Congress controls the purse strings, and they just began the appropriations process for FY 2018 (October 1, 2017–September 30, 2018) in July

  • On July 20th the full House Appropriations Committee voted to pass the LHHS bill out of committee, along party lines. The bill eliminates funding for Title X. Ranking Member Lowey proposed an amendment to restore Title X funding, but it failed. See the National Campaign’s statement on the bill

 

What Happens Next:

  • The Senate will take up their version of the bill, but our understanding is that they will not do so before the August recess. In the meantime, we need your help to protect the program

 

What Can You Do to Protect Title X?

  • Whether you can advocate or only educate, it is critical that you reach out to your members of Congress to let them know the importance of Title X to your community. If you’re not sure of the difference, please see Advocacy vs. Educating Policymakers

  • August recess is a great opportunity to meet with your Senators when they will be home in the district. Now is the time to start trying to schedule those meetings

  • If you can advocate, the ask is: “Oppose all cuts to Title X”

 

Title X Specific Resources